Through Our Eyes Photography
Education Programme
The Voyage of Discovery
You carry a camera around your neck, roam around a neighbourhood you know so well, trying to look for a photo subject and the right moment to press the shutter. You observe the light and shadow on the streets; you eavesdrop on people's conversation; sometimes you slow down, or speed up, to explore the neighbourhood in a different way. You keep photographing, hearing, smelling and feeling your surroundings. You open up all your senses and make brand-new discoveries. You put on your earphones and start playing a song by Kay Tse about the “wedding card street” in Hong Kong. It aches you to see how the city has changed. Time flies, things change. You can only preserve what is forever gone in photographs. This is a voyage of visual discovery: an old man stopping his bicycle somewhere, a parking meter counting down the minutes, the ding-dong in front of a convenience store, a courier guy pushing a hand truck past you…
You carry a camera around your neck, roam around a neighbourhood you know so well, trying to look for a photo subject and the right moment to press the shutter. You observe the light and shadow on the streets; you eavesdrop on people's conversation; sometimes you slow down, or speed up, to explore the neighbourhood in a different way. You keep photographing, hearing, smelling and feeling your surroundings. You open up all your senses and make brand-new discoveries. You put on your earphones and start playing a song by Kay Tse about the “wedding card street” in Hong Kong. It aches you to see how the city has changed. Time flies, things change. You can only preserve what is forever gone in photographs. This is a voyage of visual discovery: an old man stopping his bicycle somewhere, a parking meter counting down the minutes, the ding-dong in front of a convenience store, a courier guy pushing a hand truck past you… When you press the playback button on your camera, images pop up one after another. They not only reveal the scenes of everyday life and a dialogue between images, but also construct our memories and imaginations of the city.

Since 2013, we have been realising our passion and imagination in art education together with teachers, students and project partners. Through experimentation, trials and errors, we help our students understand photography from different perspectives, discover local neighbourhoods, explore their inner emotions through their creative work, learn how to communicate with others, and search for the random details in daily life that seem so close yet so far away. Starting from “In-between”, we have organised various photography workshops and projects under yearly themes including “Memory Landscape”, “Photo Matters” and “Folding/Unfolding”. This year, we are going back to the basics with “The Voyage of Discovery”, paying tribute to the TOE experience. We all met because of TOE. Although we play different roles in the programme, we explore together the possibilities of art, share our experiences and learn from each other.

This year, our ten Artist Educators have designed a series of photography courses, each with a different take on the art form and their views on education. By exploring self, community, the essence of photography and creative mentoring, they and their students set off a comprehensive journey in art: from technical training, determining project topics, taking photos, consolidating their creative concepts, executing their ideas in a series, production to curating an exhibition, we hope that every single experience, every single idea will inspire our students as they grow up.

Thomas Lin explores light and time with his students by focusing on the elements of photography; by experimenting with and comprehending photography, he aims to express beauty and meanings through the medium. Peggy Chan makes use of colours as the means to reveal the colours of life. By observing different colours, spaces and objects, she explores the possibilities to transform images. Matthew Kwan and his students go on field trips together and look for working materials in nature.He introduces them to different methods of image making and explores with them the relationship between photo subjects and materials, thereby helping them explore direction and interest in creative work.

Brandon Chan is mindful of the creative possibilities within local communities. He lets his students explore their school and places they are familiar with, to have an up-close look at daily life in a whole new way. By focusing on local neighbourhoods and applying pinhole photography techniques, Cheung Wai Lok teaches his students to make pinhole cameras with materials found in their communities, then create photographic works or even become part of what is happening in a community. Also basing his course on photographic devices, Lai Lon Hin makes use of the camera obscura and the mobile phone – two very different ways of seeing – to help his students explore the things they treasure and rediscover the memories buried in the deepest of their heart. Apart from being a common photographic device nowadays, mobile phones also serve as the most portable video cameras: Ellis Yip teaches basic film production theories and post-production techniques. His practice-based course allows his students to understand the narrative techniques and language of the moving image.

Li Hiuwa and Doreen Chan both apply the concepts of disassembly and rearrangement in art: Li deconstructs students' preconceived ideas about daily life objects so as to strengthen their analytical skills and abstract thinking; by teaching her students stage photography of food, disassemble and rearrange food, Chan trains their observation and sensitivity, and helps them explore the relationship between self, family and food through personal series. But what if the photo subject is yourself? Jenny Li introduces her students to the world of self-portraits by different artists, then guides them through a unique selfie project as a way to help them observe themselves and their inner world.

Each adopting a different teaching style and interesting class drills, Artist Educators of TOE have set off on a voyage of discovery with students from ten secondary schools. From March to June, they will show their students' work in schools and community venues, as well as arrange intra- and inter-school exchange sessions. Participants will share their experience and what they have gained from the projects, in turn allowing more young people to be benefited. Buddies Programme is a series of workshops designed for TOE alumni. Apart from teaching them more advanced photography techniques, we encourage the young artists to keep creating new work as a result of constant practice and peer exchange. Right now, our students are working on an exhibition to be held at common room & co., scheduled in mid-May, in order to communicate with the audience with their work. Now in its second year, our film making workshop has come to the post-production stage, after which the video works will be shown to the public during the exhibition.

Apart from creating valuable learning journeys and inspiring experiences for both educators and students, TOE is also about documenting present events and moments through the eyes of our younger generation. In early June, we will organise forum and workshop, sharing what we have seen, learnt and experienced during the programme.

Photographs capture light and shadow, time, also our experience and feelings at a certain moment. Some day in future, when our students flip through their old photos, we hope they will remember the neighbourhoods we have visited, the things they used to hold dear, the people they cared about, and have in mind a vivid picture of them taking photos and creating art with their teachers and friends.
Public Exhibition
School Exhibition
Organization Reserved Only